Living on ‘higher ed time’

D.W. at The Old College Try got the week going with a rantette about the glacial pace with which projects move and decisions are made in the higher ed marketing and communications business. I think we can all relate. She calls it “higher ed time” — “the concept that some people at colleges/universities take forever to get back to you. And when they do, it’s at the last minute and they want some major revisions.”

Quoth TOCT:

I’ve tried to pad the clock and calendar in favor of my co-workers and me by getting professors, deans, etc. design proofs and marketing plans way ahead of time. I’ve given them clear guidelines (you must get back to me by 3 pm tomorrow or else it’s a no-go), but still, they push it.

It’s nothing for me to hear back at the 10:59th hour. And usually, they want something important changed. And when it comes time for them to sign off on the changes within a 24-hour time frame, it’s like pulling teeth.

She seeks answers to the conundrum. Alas, I have none. Wish I did. How about you? Anyone out there got an answer? Bueller?

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Author: andrewcareaga

Higher ed PR and marketing guy. Communications director for Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) in Rolla, Missouri, USA. Slow runner, mediocre guitarist, lover of music and puns, and an avid St. Louis Cardinals fan. I blog and Tweet about #highered, #music, #gocards and #random stuff.

2 thoughts on “Living on ‘higher ed time’”

  1. I laughed so hard when I read that post because it’s so true. We just launched blogs/forums this week and it was a slooooooow trip there. I think if any of us could solve this problem, we’d just be consultants and make a lot of money doing it. :)

  2. Amen brother. Andrew as you may to adopt, we here in CoMo refer to it as “MU Central Standard” in our offices and really, it extends alot further then just communications circuit in higher ed, it’s all of higher ed.

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