Friday Five: Hey, why no Friday Five?

Because I’m slacking, that’s why. Intentionally.

After reviewing the data below, I realized I was underachieving on my slackitude. I’m trying to keep up with my fellow Americans.

The Stats on Slacking
Via: Online Schools (h/t: @GuyKawasaki).

Good weekend!

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Author: andrewcareaga

Higher ed PR and marketing guy. Communications director for Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T) in Rolla, Missouri, USA. Slow runner, mediocre guitarist, lover of music and puns, and an avid St. Louis Cardinals fan. I blog and Tweet about #highered, #music, #gocards and #random stuff.

2 thoughts on “Friday Five: Hey, why no Friday Five?”

  1. My reactions:
    – We need to keep people busy: http://bobsutton.typepad.com/my_weblog/2010/07/being-busy-makes-us-happier-but-our-instinct-is-to-do-nothing-.html
    – I don’t think all socialization should count as wasteful. Some networking is necessary to get work done or just to groom working relationship. (Of course, engaging in gossip is not as productive as other forms of socialization.) People may be less likely leave a work environment if it means leaving people they consider friends.
    – A lot of time if being wasted because of job dissatisfaction. Striking a balance between keeping people busy and allowing them time to socialize is important.

  2. Nikki – Thanks for the comment. I have some reactions to your reaction:

    – Re: keeping people busy. I suspect that Sutton and the research he cites is right on. But intentionally “doing nothing” is also important. Meditation, for instance, or other forms of intentional idleness (such as prayer, although many would argue that isn’t actually idleness), are key for recharging. So is sleep. It’s how we choose to use our time during those idle times, such as waiting for the luggage at the carousel, that makes a difference.

    – I agree that socialization is not all wasteful. And I couldn’t agree more about the destructive power of gossip and negative chatter. Also, the point that the infographic makes about allowing people to spend some time on YouTube and Facebook may underscore your point.

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