Battling brand fatigue in #highered

“Let Go to Let It Grow” is the title of Tony Proudfoot’s CASE Currents article. (Photo via @tonyproudfoot.)

If you’re involved in any aspect of marketing, branding or communication at a college or university, and you are a member of CASE and receive CASE’s Currents magazine, then you owe it to yourself to read a great article about branding by Tony Proudfoot (@tonyproudfoot on Twitter) in the January-February issue of Currents.  Continue reading “Battling brand fatigue in #highered”

International students can make America first in #highered

The seven countries affected by the travel ban. Map via CNN.
The seven countries affected by the travel ban. Map via CNN.

Soon after President Donald Trump signed an executive order on Friday, Jan. 27, to restrict U.S. entry by citizens of seven majority-Muslim countries, college and university officials issued a flurry of statements in response. They ranged from generic and cautiously worded memos expressing support and guidance for students and scholars from the affected countries to stronger messages critical of the Trump administration’s ban. (Purdue President Mitch Daniels’ statement — which calls the executive order “a bad idea, poorly implemented” — was among the strongest and most straightforward I’ve seen, but I’m sure there are others.) Continue reading “International students can make America first in #highered”

Friday Five: Thanks, Obama

Barack Obama, the 44th president of the United States. (Photo via InsideHigherEd.com)
Barack Obama, the 44th president of the United States. (Photo via InsideHigherEd.com)

This blog was born in 2005, during the tumultuous first year of George W. Bush’s second term as president, but it grew up during the Barack Obama presidency. Obama made his way into several posts here over the past eight years — no surprise, given the constitutional law professor’s interest in higher education policy. As Inside Higher Ed’s Doug Lederman and Paul Fain wrote on Thursday, “[N]o president in history has, with his rhetoric, so clearly embraced the idea that postsecondary education is a must for individuals and essential for the country’s economic and societal well-being” or “pushed as hard to improve its efficacy, from the belief that something so valuable should deliver on its promises.” Continue reading “Friday Five: Thanks, Obama”

Friday Five: Predictions for the new year

Will email marketing make a comeback in 2017? That's one prediction from the Content Marketing Institute's founder. Read more below.
Will email marketing make a comeback in 2017? That’s one prediction from the Content Marketing Institute’s founder. Read more below.

Curious as to what’s in store for marketing in the new year? Here are five articles or blog posts making big, bold predictions for 2017. Continue reading “Friday Five: Predictions for the new year”

16 tweets that defined my 2016

Twitter's analytics dashboard offers a month-by-month view of activity.
Twitter’s analytics dashboard offers a month-by-month view of activity.

Thanks to Twitter’s analytics tools, users can take a look at their top tweets, top mentions, top followers and other vanityesque metrics (which, we’re told, can be dangerous if misused or misinterpreted). It’s a fun stroll down a virtual memory lane. It’s also instructive, as it provides some indication of what got traction in the ephemeral social mediasphere, and perhaps offers some clues as to why. Continue reading “16 tweets that defined my 2016”

The best that I could do, 2016 edition

Another year of lackluster, off-and-on, occasionally inspired but often phoned-in blogging about higher ed, marketing and higher ed marketing is almost in the books. So it’s time once again to submit for your consideration this blog’s most popular posts of 2016, based on eyeballs. It seems the posts that got the most views — including every post listed below — are also the ones in which I offer little to no original content or thought, but merely comment on other articles circulating in the mediasphere. So it goes. And so here you go: Continue reading “The best that I could do, 2016 edition”