Friday Five: 2017’s best blog posts

It’s time for the annual look back at the year’s blog post and re-share the ones that gained the most interest.

Here are the top five, as judged by pageviews. Continue reading “Friday Five: 2017’s best blog posts”

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The year’s top marketers, according to @AdAge

Here are some of AdAge’s Marketers of the Year for 2017.

The advertising and marketing industry news site AdAge has named its 2017 marketers of the year. Tito’s Handmade Vodka came out on top, thanks to becoming the top-selling spirits variety in U.S. stores in 2017.  Continue reading “The year’s top marketers, according to @AdAge”

Friday Five: Playing catch-up

Welcome to December, the final month of what has seemed to be a very long year. I didn’t mean for last month to become No Blog November, but that’s just the way it worked out. Nothing in this space since Oct. 29. Then you get busy, look up and the next thing you know it’s Dec. 1. So it’s back to it, but I’m easing into the blogging with a Friday Five catch-up on happenings in the world of higher ed, marketing, social media and the world of work. Continue reading “Friday Five: Playing catch-up”

‘Bite Size Horror’: a frighteningly successful ad campaign

Screen capture from “Floor 9.5,” one of Mars’ scary short films for Halloween.

Pop over to the Skittles website, and you’ll find all the happy, colorful “taste the rainbow” imagery you’d expect from this candy brand. Viewers of some Fox network programming, however, recently saw a different, darker side of Skittles: a two-minute commercial in the form of a haunting horror flick.

Continue reading “‘Bite Size Horror’: a frighteningly successful ad campaign”

#highered’s perception problem

Let’s take a deeper dive into one of the findings from that Inside Higher Ed survey of admissions officers that I blogged about last week. The finding has to do with what Inside Higher Ed called our sector’s “image problems,” which I prefer to think of as problems of public perception.* Continue reading “#highered’s perception problem”

Moving away from interruption #marketing

It’s time for brands to get back to “creating the thing” instead of “the thing that interrupts the thing,” writes Andrew Essex in “The End of Advertising.”

When I was a kid in the ’60s, one of my favorite television shows was Mutual of Omaha’s Wild Kingdom. It was a wonderful, weekly view of wild animals and their wilderness habitats, narrated by zoologist Marlin Perkins and aided by his fearless sidekick Jim Fowler. The program introduced me to all manner of wild animals and environs while subtly embedding in my brain messages about conservation and respect for all living creatures (even though Perkins and Fowler often resorted to tranquilizer darts to take down and sedate various creatures for study and tagging). Continue reading “Moving away from interruption #marketing”