Friday Five: Good reads about #branding

Happy New Fiscal Year, folks! And Happy Canada Day to our friends to the north. Beyond my summer reading, which has little direct connection with the work I do, I’ve been trying to soak in some new insights about branding by reading articles on the subject. Here are a few — well, five — recent reads that I found insightful. Maybe you will, too. Continue reading

The Internet is just the internet now

The Associated Press announced the change from Internet to internet in an April 2 tweet.

The Associated Press announced the change from Internet to internet in an April 2 tweet.

Today is a day of reckoning for all of us who write about the Internet. Because as of today, many publications and news outlets are bringing the Internet down a notch by replacing its capital “I” with a lowercase one.

Say goodbye to the Internet as we’ve known it. Welcome to the internet. Continue reading

How to (appear to) disappear completely

Here’s a puzzler for you, my fellow higher ed marketers:

Let’s say you’ve got a big new thing to promote — a brand new academic offering, or a new crowdfunding campaign, or an event unlike any other before it — and you’re responsible for developing the rollout. What do you do? Continue reading

Richard Edelman and the ‘revolution in the marketer’s mindset’

Richard Edelman, one of the most prominent public relations leaders around these days, delivered a speech the other day that outlines a fundamental shift in the way PR and marketing could work together. The ideas he expressed in his talk could also have profound implications for the way marketing and communications work in higher education. Continue reading

The gospel according to brands

Economist cover showing Steve Jobs as a messiah figure.

Economist cover showing Steve Jobs as a messiah figure.

Like many of my fellow Americans of Christian heritage, I celebrated Easter Sunday in a rather typical fashion: I attended church, helped with an Easter egg hunt on church grounds, ate a few too many candy eggs, enjoyed a nice meal with family and capped the day watching college basketball. (I’m happy that North Carolina, my pick for this year’s champion in one of my brackets, advanced to the Final Four last night.) If my activities on Easter are any indication, it’s clear that the meaning behind the big Christian holidays of Easter and Christmas was not always at the forefront of my observance of the holiday. For many of us, Easter and Christmas is more about spending time with loved ones than about the religious or spiritual aspects of these days. Continue reading

Twitter at 10: I still #LoveTwitter

I #LoveTwitter so much, I even love the #failwhale

I #LoveTwitter so much, I even love the #failwhale (my 2009 Halloween costume)

Happy birthday, Twitter! The social media platform is 10 years old today, but Twitter kicked off the celebration early with this tweet and video on Sunday.

Over the past 24 hours, the love for Twitter has been pouring in from all across the globe in the form of tweets, articles and blog posts. I’m happy to see this, because Twitter has taken more than its fair share of grief over the past few months. Some people aren’t crazy about how Twitter has tweaked its timeline. Investors want to see more growth. And Twitter’s toying with the idea of expanding the character count from 140 to 10,000 has irked many users, including me.

I haven’t been with Twitter since the get-go. (Few people have.) But I signed up in September 2007 — so I’ve been on the platform for eight-plus of its 10 years. I’ve remained fairly active as a Twitter user, mainly because it remains my go-to learning network. It’s also been a way of connecting with many people I’ve never met in real life but feel like I know. Sometimes, those online connections lead to offline meetups, which is always great because I feel like I know some people — or something about those people — before I ever really meet them.

I think Lance Ulanoff best describes how I feel about Twitter in his Mashable article on the platform’s 10th anniversary:

My relationship with Twitter is best summarized as the kind you have with a sibling. I love it, deeply, but also question its choices. I can be vocal in both my admiration and my dissatisfaction. Yet, at the end of the day, we’re tied together.

 

Can #highered move from hierarchical to networked?

JUN15_08_545754619_bFor many months now, I’ve been thinking a lot about the forces discussed in this great Harvard Business Review article about the need for organizations to shift from hierarchical to networked structures. And I’ve been wondering whether higher education, bound as it has been for centuries in a hierarchical structure, can make the shift to a networked one. Continue reading