Saturday morning coffee, music, multitasking, social media brain dump

It’s late on a sleep-in Saturday morning. I’m sipping the last of the morning pot of coffee, listening to the mellow, dreamy songs of an indie/electronica band from Osaka called <a

  • href=”http://www.myspace.com/waterfai”>Water Fai* (which suits my mood perfectly), and casually multitasking — catching up on personal and work email, Twitter, RSS, and various blogs and websites. I’m in no rush. This is one of those rare lazy days when I have nowhere to be.

    So, I think I’ll blog about some of the social media stuff on my mind and in my inbox/feeds/etc. For instance:

    • How Twitter can add value. Yesterday, I and some co-workers from Missouri S&T attended the Missouri Association of Publications conference (where our alumni magazine won an award — huzzah!). One of the sessions I attended was about convergence journalism, led by a faculty member of the Missouri School of Journalism’s convergence program. Co-worker (and co-tweeter) Mindy also attended. She’s our department’s go-to social media person. Anyway, one of the storytelling tools students in that program use is Soundslides, which can be used to create audio slideshows. I made a note to check it out when I got back, but Mindy beat me to it and tweeted about it yesterday. I responded, and Brad Ward joined in on the conversation with a link to a nice presentation he made using Soundslides. Then he referred me to a blog post of his from last October about using the tool, with links to three or four other examples. All of this knowledge-sharing via Twitter, in a matter of minutes. Nice.
    • ideasonideas relaunches with a redesign. “The new ‘look,'” explains the site’s Eric Karjaluoto in a post about the relaunch, “represents both a change in direction and a bit of a revised mandate.” Eric says he wants the blog “to be a great resource for those who create communications and continually work to do so more effectively. With the volumes of content out there, I hope that you’ll find your time at ideasonideas helpful and worthwhile.” If the first post since the redesign is any indication, this one might be reading from time to time.
    • There’s a New Conversation is a month-old blog exploring the impact of the book The Cluetrain Manifesto 10 years after its release. (Has it really been 10 years?)
    • Nominations are now open for the EduStyle Awards. Go there and nominate your favorite educational websites. Winners will be honored at the eduWeb Conference in Atlantic City, N.J., in July.
    • mixx has a group for social media mavens. So, all you social media mavens out there, check it out. (I did not join, because a.) I’ve got too many social networks as it is and b.) I fear I’m not enough of a maven.) Tweet via @fsmedia.

    * Water Fai’s style is along the lines of Blonde Redhead and Asobi Seksu, but mellowed like a good shiraz.

    —————-
    Now playing: Water Fai – Round Pool
    via FoxyTunes

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    The fine art of blogslackery

    Much as I hate those self-indulgent notes some bloggers post about how their lives are far too harried to allow them to post regularly on their blogs, as if they owe their readers some sort of a detailed, my-life-is-sooo-hectic explanation, when it’s really just a way to cover for the fact that they don’t have anything really interesting or pertinent to post about — much as I hate those notes, I feel compelled to post just such a note right now. Which is why I’m writing.

    The fact is, my life is soooo hectic right now. I’m too busy to blog. I shouldn’t even be posting this note right now, but I feel I owe you some sort of explanation. I mean, I’ve got a zillion brilliant blog ideas but just no time, know what I mean? Work has been a killer, I’ve got an out-of-town meeting tomorrow, our women’s basketball team is playing lights out and will probably be selected to the Division II NCAA Tournament this Sunday, next week marks the 100th anniversary of our campus’s St. Pat’s Celebration and it’s going to be a crazy busy time, students on campus are biting the heads off of snakes to prepare for St. Patrick’s arrival. It’s just crazy busy, man.

    I’m not blogslacking. I promise. I’ll be back with some real blog posts soon. Someday. When I get the time. Because I’ve got plenty of ideas, see.

    —————-
    Now playing: Arcade Fire – Intervention
    via FoxyTunes

    BlogHighEd: new higher ed blog aggregator

    A couple of my favorite higher ed bloggers — Brad Ward and Matt Herzberger — have been working feverishly these past few weeks on a new aggregator of higher ed blogs. Today, they unveiled the beta version of their site, BlogHighEd.org.

    bloghighed.gifBlogHighEd pulls feeds from higher ed blogs and presents them in a nice, clean webpage format. Currently the site is drawing from 19 feeds, with more certain to be added in the coming days. Many of my favorites are included, but some are not — yet. If you’re a higher ed blogger and are interested in joining the BlogHighEd site, go ahead and submit an application.

    On presentations, accolades and nametags: an update from CASE District VI

    I’ve been in Denver since Sunday at the CASE District VI “Great Adventure” Conference, where I presented back-to-back sessions (Monday) titled “Crisis Communications in a Networked World” and “Communicating Change, Inside and Out.”

    It seems that both sessions were well received,. No rotten tomatoes, anyway. But I wish I hadn’t tried to cram so much into the crisis communications presentation. I wanted to talk share some info about monitoring and measuring your online reputation, but that ought to be a session in and of itself. (And it will be in a couple of upcoming conferences. Watch this blog for details.) People don’t realize just how many online tools are available for monitoring image, brand and reputation online. Nor do they realize how easy to use many of them are. And that they’re free. Anyway, trying to share all that info in a 45-50 minute presentation was like turning on the fire hose. I’ll post both presentations via Slideshare later in the week, and I’ll link to them from here.

    As great as it was to present again in my home district, the high point of the conference was last night’s awards ceremony. Our university won a grand total of 13 awards for communications, marketing, PR, design, alumni relations, development, etc. — the most we’ve ever won. Included in that list is the coveted Sweepstakes Award for overall excellence in institutional advancement, a designation we also won last year. It’s a shame more members of our communications team and our overall university advancement team weren’t on hand to share in the excitement. Only four of us from Missouri S&T made the trek to Denver this year, two of us as presenters. But we will celebrate appropriately back home. I consider myself very fortunate to work with so many talented and hard-working people.

    Two other highlights: a good friend of mine, John Amato, won the district’s distinguished service award this year (well-deserved, John!), and I thoroughly enjoyed Sunday evening’s opening keynote by Scott, the nametag guy, who also happens to be quite a blogger. Too bad I couldn’t have met him before we launched our hello campaign to introduce people to our university’s new name.